Very Basic US Build

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Frogman Ladue
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Very Basic US Build

Post by Frogman Ladue » 19 Apr 2014, 02:36

I had a project that I finished a few days before I found this place. PESCA said I should post it. So, here it is. It was originally posted on a US Gun forum. I'm just copy/pasting verbatim from another forum. Different conversations were happening between posts, so stuff may read out in an odd manner. Also, everything is in US spec'ed sizes and prices. I left out a the theory and operation stuff, as I figure you guys know all that stuff anyways.


Read through ALL instructions before you start your project. This build is not in a true chronological order (eg. do function 1, then 2, then 3, etc.). It has been listed in a "Project Order". Some functions need to be started before another can start. Some functions will need to be modified after completion. Read through all posts before you start.

I'm not telling you to buy these EXACT parts. This list is just the exact stuff I used for the build. You have many options available to you for different components. Options, and what to (not) buy will be discussed later in the thread.

The budget has crept over $200 on my end. It was racked up, by some redundant and unneeded parts. I spent the better part of two months buying and returning electronics and optics gear, until I found stuff that worked well for the application. There are certainly cheaper items and suppliers out there, and I'd imagine that most of you have some of the items, sitting around the house, which you can hack and mod to work for this project. As I had said before, the spirit of the project predicated that I produce precise list of products, that anyone with minimal skills, can buy and build a working unit. I'm confident that based on the stuff I got sitting around the house, I could have built this for less than $100. But, that is beside the point of the project. I took the hit on the bank account so y'all have access to instructions, specs, and theories. 8)

Parts List:

One "Loaner" gun with an abundance of rails.

Home Depot:
A.) 1-1/2" PVC Female Trap Adapter. Deerborn Brass/Oatey P#(HP9000A) $1.15
B.) 2x 3/4" Copper End Caps. $2.60
C.) 6" of 1-1/2" PVC. $Varies ($2.ish)
D.) 1-1/2" PVC End Cap (Preferably a Flat Cap, not the Hemispherical Cap.) Spears P#(116-015) $1.79
E.) PVC Cement Combo Pack. $6.97
F.) 8x AA Batteries. $7.98
G.) 1/4"-20 Nut/Bolt/Lock washer/2x Washer. $1.ish
H.) 3/4" Copper Pipe Coupler $.99
I.) Pack of Velcro. $2.97
J.) Pack of Velcro Cable Ties. $3.47

Total: Around $27.00. Prices will vary a little from store to store, as specific suppliers change by region.

Links:
A.) Sorry, No link available for 1-1/2" PVC PVC Female Trap Adapter. (HP9000A). It's not online but it is in the stores...see below for pics. This one is very close and will work...http://www.homedepot.com/p/NIBCO-1-1-2- ... /100348180
B.) http://www.homedepot.com/p/Unbranded-3- ... /204508377
C.) Check stores for cut lengths of PVC. I've seen them as short as 2'.
D.) http://www.homedepot.com/p/Mueller-Stre ... /100120269 This is the hemispherical cap. I could not find the flat cap on line, but they are in most stores.
E.) http://www.homedepot.com/p/Oatey-8-oz-P ... /100151579
F.) http://www.homedepot.com/p/Duracell-Cop ... /100351421
G.) You are going to have to dig in the bins.
H.) http://www.homedepot.com/p/Mueller-Stre ... /100011745
I.) http://www.homedepot.com/p/Velcro-4-in- ... /202261921
J.) http://www.homedepot.com/p/Commercial-E ... /202527252


Super Circuits:

A.) 700 TVL Color Standard Lens Board Camera PC602XS $99.99
B.) Male BNC to Female RCA Adapter $1.99 (Optional bought as adapter for external camera to take pics for this thread.)
C.) 2-1/2" Color LCD CCD Monitor w/internal battery and charger $49.99
D.) 2x Male Power Connectors $2.58 (Optional...you can cut/splice hard wired connections)
E.) 16mm Lens $14.99 (Optional....you may be able to find a camera with a 16mm lense already installed.) I have some of these for sale, PM me.

Subtotal: $169.54
Shipping $13.73
Total: $183.27

Links:
A.)http://www.supercircuits.com/catalog/pr ... gory/1321/
B.) http://www.supercircuits.com/advancedse ... t/?q=con-4
C.) http://www.supercircuits.com/color-tft- ... -lcd0250sm
D.) http://www.supercircuits.com/accessorie ... s-male-pow
E.) http://www.supercircuits.com/accessorie ... ens-ml16sg


Radio Shack:
A.) 8xAA Battery Holder. $2.99
B.) 9V Battery Holder. $2.99 (Allows you to hook up to the 8xAA holder, and gives you 9v capability for back up juice)

Total: $4.98 There are other options here for holders. Prices will vary.

Links:
A.) http://www.radioshack.com/product/index ... Id=2062251
B.) http://www.radioshack.com/product/index ... Id=2062219


Amazon:
A.) IR Illuminator $9.83

Shipping: $5.29
Total: $15.12

Link:
A.) http://www.amazon.com/Etekcity%C2%AE48- ... pd_sim_p_6


Gun Stuff.
A.) Rails ($Free) Thanks BUKU DINKY DAU! I had to buy rails.I don't own any guns, and if I did, they certainly wouldn't have rails. ;)
B.) 4x 1" Scope Rings. One pair I had, other set bought on the boards. $10 Thanks motrapper!
C.) Used Simmons 40mm, 3X-9X scope I found at the Gun Show $35.
D.) [s]2x 30mm Scope Rings $14.73[/s] MilsurpStuff.com, Thanks benny429! For Sale in WTS. I couldn't get them to work for what I needed.


Consumables:
Regular Elmer's Glue
Solder
Flux
Rattle Can of Super-Dooper Tactical Black-ops Paint.
Electric Tape
Caulk or RTV, You just need a drop to seal a hole.
Crazy Glue

Tools:
Soldering Iron
Scissors
Knife
Drill w/Bits
Screw Drivers
Small Socket Set
Hammer
Hack Saw
Digital Volt-Ohm Meter (DVOM)
Torch


The three big components of this project are the camera, the screen, and the power supply. You can cut the cost of the camera in half if you buy a type of camera called a "board camera", or hack a Harbor Freight Security Camera (if you are handy with un-soldering boards) with similar specs as stated in the next post. I ended up paying more for a camera unit that had more versatility that the project required. I plan on using this particular camera for other projects, so I bought something that cost a little more, in a configuration that will save me time on other projects.

You can save a bunch on the monitor unit. Ripping and hacking the eyepiece viewer off of an old school VHS camera will give you a great screen, dirt cheap, and a really nice eyepiece. Screens are available from aftermarket automotive suppliers, where you can hack a rear-view reverse camera screen for a few bucks less. An honorable mention for an $24 alternative is here... http://www.newfrog.com/p/3-5inch-color- ... 53231.html ...granted, you are going to have to use a couple of brain cells and tools to get it to work...but it will for half the cost. The unit I bought is a dedicated Service Man/Installer's tool. I bought it just for the convenience of the tool side of things. As I expect to use it for other projects. You just need a monitor...a "Closed Caption Monitor/Display". You can use a small television, but you end up paying for the audio side of the electronics, speakers, a tuner, input/output hookups, etc.

The Main Supplier I used for electronics is Super Circuits. They are a bit pricey. But, their low light equipment is about the best that I could find on the net for the Maker. Customer service is good. Technical support is lacking. Look, ya can't just stroll onto a supplier's website and say "Hey, I wanna to build a weaponized NV attachment for my gun. What do I need?" You gotta do some research on your own....or have someone like me do it for you. \:D/ Outside of that, Super Circuits served me well.

http://www.supercircuits.com/

The Secondary Supplier I used for electronics is SecurityCameras2000. Their prices are very low for the industry, they offer more brand names and choices for equipment. In some cases they have far better equipment. Their customer service and technical support are nonexistent. They are a company that has warehouses world wide. There is no real guarantee as to which country the order will ship out of. US customs is involved. Shipping is dead slow, and certainly does not build confidence in the transaction. They say they do not sell to Canada. CONUS sales only. You may have to sign a waver that you will not resell the stuff to the middle east. I was unable to return items to them. They would not reply to my emails. On Amazon, they go by "SC2" and "SC2000". The same items are on the corporate sales site and cheaper. If you want to save some cash, and you know exactly what you are buying, they may be worth the gamble.

http://www.securitycamera2000.com/

With the power supply, all the electrical components (camera/screen/illuminator) are built to run on 9-12v DC power. Once again, the spirit of the project mandated that I produce precise components. All you really need is a 9-12v source to power everything. RC model power packs, AirSoft power packs, 9v batteries, lantern batteries, old power tool batteries, are all in that voltage spectrum and can be hacked/modded/kitbashed/etc., to be made to work on the cheap.

I'm giving you the basics. If you want to make it cheaper or better, the next post and any discussion should help you to do what ever you want with the concepts. 8)
Last edited by Frogman Ladue on 19 Apr 2014, 19:59, edited 1 time in total.
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Frogman Ladue
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Re: Very Basic US Build

Post by Frogman Ladue » 19 Apr 2014, 02:36

Read through ALL lists, instructions, and theories before you start your project. This build is not in a true chronological order (eg. do function 1, then 2, then 3, etc.). It has been listed in a "Project Order". Some functions need to be started before another can start. Some functions will need to be modified after completion. Read through all posts before you start.

Ok, lets set out our parts:

***Click any pic in this thread and it will enlarge.***


Plumbing Stuff:

Image

From left to right, we have 1-1/2" trap adapter, section of 1-1/2" PVC pipe, 1-1/2" PVC pipe cap, 2x 3/4" copper end caps, and a 1" copper coupler.


Electronics Stuff:

Image

From left to right, we have AA batteries and a 8xAA battery holder, camera unit, M-type connector, 2.5" monitor, 9v battery clip, IR illuminator.

Ok, lets get started....

Step one, is build the power supply. If you are using the same components I bought, put the AA batteries in the holder as directed on the case. The holder does not have existing leads, it connects via a 9v battery holder. You will extend the leads of the 9v adapter with wire. Polarity matters. If you are looking to hard wire connections, cutting off the power jack on the camera's included harness will give you two wires, one black, one red. Red goes to red (positive). Black goes to black (negative).

Image

If you are using male jacks as depicted above in the parts list, you need the center conductor to be positive, and the outside barrel to be negative. Use a DVOM to make sure that polarity is correct, or you blow up your brand new camera. These power jacks are standardized across the surveillance camera industry. If you don't like the style I suggested above, Amazon has pages of them for sale. I honestly used Radio Shack, a pair of "Size M Coaxial DC Power Plugs". http://www.radioshack.com/product/index ... Id=2103614 These were waaay overpriced, an the jack has to be disassembled and micro soldered to get them to work. Not a task for a beginner. Heck, I was really bored on a Saturday evening, and I didn't feel like waiting for shipping...so, Radio Shack it is.

You can skimp on power by just using 9v batteries for everything. As explained in the next post, these items can run between 9-12vDC. If you use the same power supply for both camera and monitor, you may get a camera feedback noise on the screen. If this happens, let me know in a reply. A polarized capacitor needs to be placed on the positive lead of both the camera and the screen to dampen the interference. I'll try to work with you on what you need to buy. Granted, I don't have the same components sitting in front of me to test, but I can steer you in a direction. The screen unit I bought has an internal battery and charges like a cellphone. So, I didn't have to worry about feedback noise.

Step two, is set up the camera/screen combo to view an image. We need to be able to see what the camera sees for the step three. Wiring Time! :taze: Connections are pretty much standardized across the security camera industry, so this shouldn't be too hard for anyone. Step 1, certainly required more skill than this step. You should not have to buy anything special for this step. If you bought the same components that I did, all needed harnesses are included with the components.

Tahh-Dahh..wiring harness (the big picture) click for larger pic.

Image

Camera Harness Detail...

Image

Monitor Harness Detail...

Image

Note: For those that choose a cutting/splicing/hard wiring method, the wiring will be color coded. Red for positive power, black for ground, yellow for signal. There may be two blacks, one for power ground, one for signal ground. You can merge them and get the same affect. You'll generally see a 3-wire hookup for power and signal. Power up the camera, power up the screen, hook up signal wire, and you should be seeing an image on the screen. If you choose to buy a camera with On Screen Display (OSD) the wiring will be far different. I honestly cannot help you with it unless you post pics of the harness and wiring diagram included in the instructions.

2.1 Plug camera harness into back of camera.

Image

2.2 Plug camera harness into power supply. Mate camera harness with monitor harness.

Image

2.3 Plug monitor harness MCX connector into AV port on side of monitor

Image


2.4
Switch on monitor. Adjust contrast, and brightness on monitor (adjustment knobs/button are on side of monitor just like a TV).

Image

2.5 If you replaced the lens, the lens will need to be focused. The camera unit I bought came with a factory installed and focused 3.6mm lens. This lens lacked the magnification to work for the application. I had to swap it out for a 16mm to simulate the image that my eyeball can see, while looking through the scope without any attachments. If you buy a camera unit with a factory installed 16mm lens, you can skip this substep. The factory lens is locked via a set screw...

Image

...set screw location. You will need a 2mm jewelry screwdriver to loosen the set screw. BE GENTILE! Everything is plastic. It does not take much to loosen the screw, it does not take much to synch in down on another lens housing. Pro Tip...don't back the set screw all the way out. If you back it out all the way, you will never get the tiny threads started again. Unscrew the factory lens, screw in 16mm lens until it is about 1/8" from the housing base. You will need to focus the new lens and synch the set screw. Do NOT turn the lens all the way in. It will come in contact with the image chip and shatter it.
There is a spectrum in focusing the lens. If the lens is too far out, the image will be cloudy and blurry. If the lens is too far in, the image will be highly pixelated and look like an Atari game. There is a sweet spot on the focusing. To start with a base focus, focus for "across the room distance" in day light. Focusing will look like the aforementioned spectrum starting from; cloudy/blurry, to slightly cloudy sharpness, to perfect, to sharp with slightly random pixelation, to highly pixelated. You want your focus to be slightly skewed to the "slightly cloudy sharpness" side of the spectrum. Reason being, when the camera's chip switches over to low light imaging, the image will be come "sharp with slightly random pixelation on its own. This is just the camera doing what it is designed to do. If you focus for "perfect", when it switches over to low light, the image will be more pixelated than need be. After you get the unit mounted to the gun, you then will be able to determine if you need to focus the camera any further. If you bought a camera with the needed 16mm lens, factory installed, DON'T MESS WITH THE FOCUS!!!!

***At this point, you should have a very small camera, producing an image on a very small screen.***

Step three is to start building a camera chamber that mounts on the back of the scope. You will be using the PVC components for this step. STEP AWAY FROM THE GLUE! You're not ready for it yet. There will be a bit of adjusting that needs to take place. Glue comes last...after you have all your adjustments in order.

3.1 There are a whole bunch of ways to go on the trap adapter. This gist is, you need some kind of compression type fitting, to fit the outside of the ocular lens chamber on your scope. Different brands and styles of fittings will have different internal diameters. Some are larger/smaller than others. There is some wiggle room on size, you'll have to find one to fit your scope. Another honorable mention to the project is using a "PVC Compression Repair Fitting"...
Image
...which is a short piece of pipe with compression fittings on both ends. This will give you the advantage of not having to buy glue, and a whole bunch of adjustablity. The easiest way to buy the right fitting is just take the scope into Home Depot or the Hardware store with you. Spend some time in the plumbing section and find a compression fitting to the scope. The adapter suggested above, is pretty specific to a 1.5" ocular housing. I had to do some back-and-forth work to find an adapter to fit the scope. Place coupler/repair fitting/compression fitting over the ocular lens as such.

Image

3.2 After you find a compression type fitting that fits the scope, you have to build in for parallax adjustment for the camera. Here, the camera lens positioning is replacing the human eye, and requires the need for adjustablity. I started with a rough measurement by holding up the scope to my eye, finding a distance that parallax was eliminated, and had an assistant with a tape measure, take a rough measurement from the ocular lens to my eye. This measurement gave me a starting point to cut down the piece of 1-1/2" PVC pipe to lengthen/shorten the camera chamber. There will be some back-and-forth adjustment of the pipe before you get the perfect parallax distance.

Image

3.3 Take your operating electrical sub assembly from step two, and turn it on. Hold the camera to the rear of the parallax tube and view the image on the screen. This is a very good time to get acquainted to the camera image, with regards to what is up/down, left/right on the camera. You are looking to eliminate the "black ring" effect from the parallax. With the 16mm lens, there will be just a bit of parallax-just enough to round out the corners of the image on the rectangle screen. This will give you an idea of how far you need to cut down the parallax tube.

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3.3 TEMPORARILY place the camera in the inside of the 1.5" pipe cap.

Image

Get an idea as to where the center point is. Somewhere in this cap, you will need to drill a hole to allow the camera wiring harness to pass through.

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The camera I used has all the connections on the back of the unit. I drilled a hole in the back of the cap to allow the camera harness to pass through.

Image

3.4 Afix camera to inside of the 1.5" pipe cap. I had used industrial Velcro to affix the camera to the back of the chamber, because I plan on removing later and using it for other projects. If you get good Velcro, it should be enough to permanently mount to the camera. The stuff I got has adhesive so strong, it'll rip your skin off! If you wish to permanently mount the camera, do not use anything that may be conductive like JB weld. Do not mount the camera by emerging it in a puddle of epoxy, the chip set gets warm and needs to breath. A dab of rubberized glue is all you need. Try to get the board as centered and as level as possible, inside the cap. It does not have to be perfect, as the compression fitting will allow wiggle-room for adjustment of the entire assembly.

3.5 This is the point where you need to double check all your measurements, before you start gluing stuff. Place cap-with-camera inside on back of 1.5" PVC pipe "parallax tube". Don't worry about level cross hairs, or centered cross hairs. These issues can be adjusted by twisting or tweaking the positioning of the entire chamber. Parallax is paramount! The rest is just a twist or nudge away. Cut down the parallax tube to fine adjust the parallax distance.

Image

3.6 Take it all apart. NOW you may glue stuff. Use the PVC cement to glue the parallax tube to the compression fitting. STOP! DO NOT GLUE THE CAMERA CAP WITH PVC CEMENT!

3.7 Mask the hole that the wiring connector passes through. Mask the camera. Paint entire assembly black...because tactical.

Image

3.8 After the tactical paint dries, remove masking. Mount entire assembly to ocular lens of the the gun scope. Plug in camera wiring harness. (IF you are making a permanent assembly, put a small drop of Crazy Glue on the MINI MOLEX connector. DO NOT unplug it and put Crazy Glue in it, as the glue will coat the connectors and the camera won't work. Just place a SMALL dot on the mated male/female connection to seal it, and keep it from popping loose.) Fill wire pass through hole with RTV to seal out any dirt or dust. The camera-in-cap assembly should have a positive friction fit to the back of the parallax tube. If it fits tight, leave it alone. If it fits loose, secure it with a light coat of Elmer's glue. You do not want the cap assembly to be a permanent fit, as you may need to service it later, or clean a lens.

Image

Step four is the build the screen bracket and set up the screen.

4.1 Take the 1" copper coupler and put a slice in it, long ways, with a hack saw. Spread the coupler out, and hammer it flat with a hammer. After you get into a flat plate, apply flux acid to one side of the plate. Apply flux acid to the closed side of one of the 3/4" copper caps. Heat with torch. Apply soldier. Let cool and clean.

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4.2 Shoot down the plate with Rattle-Can black....because tactical. When the go-fast paint dries, mount cap portion of the screen bracket to a 1" scope ring.

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4.3 Apply Velcro to front of bracket and back of monitor.

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4.4 Mount monitor to monitor bracket. Clamp assembly down to rail.

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Step five Set up the IR illumination assembly. We will use the remaining parts. A 1" scope ring, the remaining 3/4" copper cap, nut and bolt, and IR illuminator...

Image

5.1 Take the remaining 3/4" copper cap and drill a (slightly larger than) 1/4" hole in the center of the cap portion. Stick 1/4"-20 bolt through included bracket on the IR illuminator. Apply washer, then lock washer, and then nut to bolt threads within the cap. Tighten bolt with socket set...

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5.2 Mask the illuminator lens, and shoot the whole assembly with Rattle-Can black...because tactical...

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5.3 Cinch the 3/4" cap portion of the assembly in a 1" scope ring. Mount to rail on gun...

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Step 6. Wire management.

***You should now have all your components mounted to the gun. Organize your wiring and cinch it down with the Velcro cable ties. Trim wiring if you wish.***

Image

I realize this looks like crap, but I chose not to trim any wiring as this whole assembly will get taken apart for other projects.

Step 7. Back to wiring.

7.1 Take your perfectly good power harness from step one, and trim it. Yup, cut it up. Now that you have all your electrical components in order, and your harness where they need to be, trim the power harness so that the power supply fits in your pocket, vest, or pouch so that the wiring slack is eliminated. When you trim, splice in the second power connector. This connector will be needed to send power to the illuminator assembly.

Image

7.2 Plug in power connector to the camera harness, and the illuminator assembly.

***At this point, you will have a operational Night Vision attachment on your gun***

8)
Evolving work in progress, E700+DSA (Build Finished Feb2016)..Link

Last update to US spec'ed E700+DSA T-20,T67 Build. (US Parts List!)...Link

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chas
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Re: Very Basic US Build

Post by chas » 19 Apr 2014, 06:54

Now that is one hell of a thread Frogman, I doff my hat to you for the time and effort put into it. :thumbup:
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22-250jock
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Re: Very Basic US Build

Post by 22-250jock » 19 Apr 2014, 07:03

very detailed build Frogman :clap: :clap:

liking the use of the copper for the screen mount :thumbup:

thanks for taking the time to write it all up

cheers jock
“When guns are outlawed, only the Government will have guns. The Government - and a few outlaws. If that happens, you can count me among the outlaws.”
― Edward Abbey,

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Torchwood
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Re: Very Basic US Build

Post by Torchwood » 19 Apr 2014, 07:38

Wow, you did say it was detailed. A lot of good ideas there. Copper plate is one of them. I enjoyed American terminologies too. Great writ up :thumbup:
Image

PESCA

Re: Very Basic US Build

Post by PESCA » 19 Apr 2014, 08:47

Thanks for that, Frogman :thumbup:

So glad you took the time to post it. It's great when you see pics and get an insight into the methods others use to put their units together. Helps everyone else along the path.

Loving the speech balloons in the photographs, by the way.

Thanks.
George

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gypo
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Re: Very Basic US Build

Post by gypo » 19 Apr 2014, 09:30

Very good explanation Frogman, well done for taking the time to post this :thumbup:
G

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yammo
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Re: Very Basic US Build

Post by yammo » 19 Apr 2014, 15:31

What can i say that hasn't already been said well explained :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

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Frogman Ladue
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Re: Very Basic US Build

Post by Frogman Ladue » 19 Apr 2014, 22:41

The whole idea of the build was not to make a awesome setup, but to build a setup and document it in a way, so that anyone with basic skills could replicate it. It was never meant to be a great performance NV build. It was meant to be an easy build. There are nearly 22000 members on that other forum. Some of the members do not read nor write very well. So, it got dumbed down to as close as I could get, to a build that reads like a picture book.
Evolving work in progress, E700+DSA (Build Finished Feb2016)..Link

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Frogman Ladue
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Re: Very Basic US Build (FrogVision)

Post by Frogman Ladue » 27 Jun 2014, 21:58

Updated with a new Monitor and a T-20...still a work-in-progress.


Read through ALL lists, instructions, and theories before you start your project. This build is not in a true chronological order (eg. do function 1, then 2, then 3, etc.). It has been listed in a "Project Order". Some functions need to be started before another can start. Some functions will need to be modified after completion. Read through all posts before you start. This build encompasses multiple pages in this thread.


Hey guys, update time.

I did some buying and building. In this revision, we are replacing the original IR Illuminator with a far better unit. Also, the Monitor has been swapped out for an HD unit that is nearly double the size and resolution. In this revision, the improved pieces/parts were actually cheaper than v1.0's components, less bubba, and were certainly less labor intensive to build. My goal here (aside from obligatory bigger and better) was to come up with a new assembly that is more modular than the last version. In v1.0, the rifle required lots of add-on rails. In this version, all you will need is one rail, with a scope attached. Everything will now attach to the scope in one modular unit.



Parts List:


Leftovers from ToadVision v1.0:
A.) 850nm IR modded UniqueFire T-20 Flashlight
B.) 1x 1" scope ring

Total: Around $50

Link:
A. & B.) http://www.sksboards.com/smf/index.php? ... msg1537971


Hardware Store:
A.) 6" length of 1/4"-20 Threaded Rod...$1
B.) 1x 1/4"-20 Square Nut...$1
C.) 1x 1/4" Washer...$1
D.) 1x 1/4"-20 Nyloc Lock Washer...$1

Total: Around $5

No Links, Go to your local hardware store!


Aliexpress:
A.) 5" TFT LCD HD Rear View Monitor...$32.59 free shipping

Total: $32.59

Link:
A.) http://www.aliexpress.com/item/5-TFT-LC ... 74106.html
A.) [Alternative Part]http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Free-shi ... 90539.html...this one is $5 cheaper, and has similar specs. I don't own one of these. I cannot comment on its features, but it may be worth a gamble to save $5.



Amazon:
A.) UTG Double Rail/3 Slot Angle Mount w/QD Lever Mount...$11.97 free shipping
B.) Ade Advanced Optics 1" Scope Ring Adaptor with Picatinny/weaver/universal Rail...$12.99 free shipping

Total: $24.96

Links:
A.) http://www.amazon.com/UTG-Rated-Double- ... TG+MAD0340
B.) http://www.amazon.com/Ade-Advanced-Adap ... +ring+rail


Electronics:
A.) BNC to RCA Adaptor...$1.99 +shipping
B.) Short RCA Patch Cable -or- RCA Coupler...$.50

Links:
A.) See v1.0 parts list Super Circuits http://www.supercircuits.com/accessorie ... pter-con-4
B.) Radio Shack http://www.radioshack.com/product/index ... Id=2102663

Total: Around $5 with shipping.


Consumables, left over from v1.0:
A.) Heat Shrink Tubing
B.) Crazy Glue

Tools:
A.) Assortment of Small Allen Keys If you bought the same parts I listed above, the parts come with the needed Allen Keys.
B.) Hacksaw
C.) Small Crescent Wrench
D.) Small Slip Joint/Channel Lock Wrench
E.) Torch
F.) #7 or 13/64" Drill Bit and Drill
G.) 1/4"-20 Tap with Handle
H.) Can of Black-Ops Tactical Black Paint
I.) Black Permanent Marker


Ok guys, with this revision, we will be abandoning the multi-LED IR Illuminator for a purpose modded, focusable, and tacticool flashlight. Gotta be tacticool, because someone has to impress the AR guys. 8) The copper plumbing components have been abandoned. The need for a "plethora of rails" is now gone. In preparation for v2.0, I'm building as "Modular as Possible". I want to build a set up that I can run on all my scoped guns, with out the restrictions of the compression fittings, and without the need for multi-rails like we had in v1.0.

We will also abandoning the 2.5" "420/500TVL'ish" frankenMonitor for a 5", (720 advertised) HD Monitor. The new Monitor will not have internal batteries. This will lighten things up a bit. If you built a power supply like in v1.0, you can use the second power lead (which was abandoned when the multi-LED Illuminator was scrapped) to power the Monitor.

All-in-all, we shed some weight in loosing all the brackets, rails, and rings. We added weight with the battery in the T-20 Illuminator. We should break even in weight. We should be saving money as a number of components are no longer needed, and the better tech actually costs less.

NOTE: Foreign Supplier Warning! We had some shipping and support problems in v1.0 by buying stuff from foreign websites. At this point in the game, and what we are actually buying, you ain't gonna find this stuff on the domestic market. You HAVE to by through China Mainland, direct suppliers. They offer free shipping, which takes about a month. If the stuff you buy is wrong or broken, yer screwed. Make sure you know what you are buying before you place the order!




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Read through ALL lists, instructions, and theories before you start your project. This build is not in a true chronological order (eg. do function 1, then 2, then 3, etc.). It has been listed in a "Project Order". Some functions need to be started before another can start. Some functions will need to be modified after completion. Read through all posts before you start. This build encompasses multiple pages in this thread.

Ok, let's set out our parts:

[center]***Click any pic in this thread and it will enlarge.***[/center]

Electronics and Mounts:

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From left to right, we have our modded T-20 IR Illuminator, 1" scope ring, Ade Advanced Optics 1" Scope Ring Adaptor, UTG Double Rail/3 Slot Angle Mount, and 5" TFT LCD HD Rear View Monitor.



Hardware:

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From Top, Down, we have section of 1/4"-20 threaded rod, 1/4" washer, 1/4"-20 Nyloc lock nut, and 1/4"-20 square nut.


Step One: Rings and Rails...

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It's really cut and dry here...put the 1" scope ring on the flashlight. Now, put this aside, we'll come back to it in a later step.

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Mount the 1" Weaver/Picatinny adaptor on the scope. Now, put this aside, we'll come back to it in a later step.


Step Two: Start to build the Monitor Base

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Real easy. The UTG mount has holes in it. Stick the 1/4"-20 rod through the hole. Catch the base of the rod with the square 1/4"-20. Drop the 1/4" washer over the top. Take your crescent wrench and tighten the Nyloc nut down onto the washer.

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Take the Rod-in-45' Base assembly and hold it up to the Monitor with bracket attached. We are going to cut up the Monitor base. Obviously, the suction cup base will not mount to anything on a rifle. So, the Rod-in-45' Base will become the new Monitor mount. We are going to have to bend the rod, 90's to match the angle of the Gimbal attachment on the factory, plastic monitor base. Mark the rod with a permanent marker, where you need to start the 90' bend.

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Right above your mark, heat the rod with a torch until red hot. Quickly bend the rod 90's with Slip Joint/Channel Lock pliers. Be sure not to pinch the pliers down too hard on the rod. We don't want to booger up the threads. Let air cool, and set this part aside. We'll return to it in a later step.


Step Three: Neuter the Monitor Bracket

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Take your Monitor and base and synch the suction cup down on a work surface. The suction cup base really adheres to smooth surfaces. This makes things easier in the next steps as it really locks down and eliminates the need for a "third hand". 8)

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Unscrew the locking ring and separate the Gimbal mount halves.

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Chuck up either a #7 or 13/64" bit to a drill and drill through the Gimbal. When the suction cup base was molded in the factory, the mold flashing was snapped off right in the center of the ball. There is a really nice divot in the ball which will provide a center mark for the drill bit. Drill completely through the ball and into the base. When the bit just breaks through the base, stop drilling. GO SLOW! YOU ONLY GOT ONE SHOT AT THIS!

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After you back the drill bit out, insert the 1/4"-20 tap, and SLOWLY cut in threads with the use of the tap handle. When the tap just breaks out of the hole in the base, stop and back the tap out slowly.

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Take the hack saw and cleanly cut the ball off the mount. GO SLOW! You want to end up with a sphere with a clean tapped hole through the center.

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When you end up with a tapped sphere, stop. Put the threaded ball aside. We'll come back to it in a later step. The scrap base can be discarded. I'm holding onto my scrapped base. It's a great base for another project. I may turn in into a cup holder base for the boat. Or, may be a cell phone mount for the motorcycle. I don't know yet, but I hate to see a good, lever lock, suction cup base end up in a landfill.


Step Four: Combine the Two Bases

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We're going to trim the 1/4"-20 rod to 1 & 1/4" past the 90' bend. The rod will become the new base...a firm base that holds up to recoil.

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Tactical Paint time! Because why.................because tactical, that's why. Take the Block Ops, Advanced Warfare, IR absorbing paint, and black out the nuts, washer, and rod. I put some heat shrink tubing on the rod. I didn't want to impale a wrist or a palm on the thread. Then again, I should be wearing my Tactical Gloves when I shoot. :tard:

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Apply Crazy Glue to the rod threads, and screw on the Gimbal sphere. Set this aside and let all the Crazy Glue dry over night.

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Apply a dot of Crazy Glue to the Gimbal pocket on the back of the Monitor. We don't want the monitor falling off under recoil.

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After the glue and paint have dried over night, place the plastic lock ring over the newly completed base, snap the Monitor half of the assembly onto the Gimbal sphere.

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Thread and tighten lock ring to put tension on the completed Gimbal mount.

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On the remaining 45' portion of the UTG Rail Adaptor, mount the completed T-20 Illuminator from Step One.


Step Five: Mount Monitor/Illuminator Combo to the Scope Rail Adaptor

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Adjust the tension on the QD connector with included Allen key. Synch the entire Monitor/Illuminator assembly down onto the Abe Tactical Rail Adaptor we installed in Step One. Note: I put the Monitor strait up and the Illuminator off to the side, just so I could take detailed build pics. You can put the Abe Tactical Rail Adaptor where ever you want on the scope. The UTG 45' mount can be build out with the Illuminator on either side. You can swing the Monitor low for right or left hand shooting just by adjusting the mounting bolts. Ultimately, it's your build. Place the components where you want to.

Step Six: Wire Up the Camera and the Monitor. :taze:

Camera Side of Harness...
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Real simple here, all plug-and-play. We are adding a BNC to RCA adaptor (see v1.0 parts list). The Camera has a BNC output. The Monitor has a RCA input. We need to adapt the BNC to fit RCA. A RCA Patch Cable -or- RCA Male/Male Coupler is needed to joint the two harness halves.

Monitor Side of Harness...
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Once again, plug-and-play. Plug your power supply into the red power jack. Merge the yellow RCA connector with the BNC adaptor from the Camera harness with either a RCA Patch Cable, or RCA Coupler. Note: Use yellow connector on the Monitor harness. The yellow connector is self powering. When the Monitor sees signal from the Camer, through the yellow RCA connector, the Monitor will automatically power on. The White connector can be tapped over and abandoned. It is a secondary video input. It's not needed, unless you want to drag a DVR with you and watch movies through Toadvision v1.5 rev2 while you hunt.

Step Seven: Power Up and Adjust. Follow instructions from v1.0 to adjust camera lens.

Back of Monitor...
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There are three buttons on the back of the Monitor. These buttons control the OSD (On Screen Display) options on the Monitor. Button functions are as follows: Up, Down, and Select. OSD menu functions control the following: Color, Brightness, Contras, and "Zoom". Zoom switches between 4.3 and 16.9 ratio display. The Camera produces signal at 4.3. At 16.9 on the Monitor, the image will be enlarged and stretched to fit the screen.

Step Eight: Wire Managment.

***You should now have all your components mounted to the gun. Organize your wiring and cinch it down with the Velcro cable ties. Trim wiring if you wish.***




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Evolving work in progress, E700+DSA (Build Finished Feb2016)..Link

Last update to US spec'ed E700+DSA T-20,T67 Build. (US Parts List!)...Link

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