Solaris srx Laser

Flashlights, IR illuminators. Projects, reviews and queries. DIY 'stickies' here too.
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Mini Magnum
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Re: Solaris srx Laser

Post by Mini Magnum » 21 Aug 2018, 11:57

Laser illuminators bring a rear add on to life, no LED system can match them for intensity or throw, I use one most of the time for rear add ons, IMO much better. As long as your aware its a laser your using and don't glare at it your fine, just use your hand in front of the beam to ensure its off.

jackal1
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Re: Solaris srx Laser

Post by jackal1 » 21 Aug 2018, 11:59

cliveward wrote:
21 Aug 2018, 11:18
Hi All,

It does indeed look like the silly high power laser IR idea has come around full circle again. :wtf:

The new laser diodes available are great for making a very small sensibly powered illuminator, or a very long range very high power collimated illuminator where exposure to the beam can be controlled, i.e. on the top of a CCTV camera pole where people can't get close enough to the source to be harmed.

However when you put one of these in very high power behind a tightly collimating lens system and fit it to a hand held or rifle mounted system you end up with a completely different set of circumstances.

I ran the numbers through our simulation software using one manufacturers standard specs of one of these new wonder lasers, and that resulted in eye safety at 20m+, but at 30cm the exposure was over 4000 times the safe level. This was using conservative numbers, and interestingly I had the opportunity to put the actual laser IR in question over our power meter here when a customer brought one in and it was emitting considerably more power than the stated 500mW. Making it Class 4 and even more dangerous. :(

And this particular one was not the most collimated or power dense of these new 'inventions'. :shock:


Cheers





Clive


And your point is what exactly?

People know these lasers are not eye safe and treat them accordingly. They have a place used with n/v and are considerably better than any LED torch with an i/r pill. With the added bonus that they give off a very tiny red signature thus making them a great deal more covert than LED torches, a worthwhile feature when dealing with lamp shy foxes.

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cliveward
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Re: Solaris srx Laser

Post by cliveward » 21 Aug 2018, 12:54

jackal1 wrote:
21 Aug 2018, 11:59

And your point is what exactly?

People know these lasers are not eye safe and treat them accordingly.
The point is the average consumer doesn't know these are not safe, especially when manufacturers marketing blurb states that they are UK legal, designed with safety in mind, as safe as they can possibly be, etc. :roll:


Cheers





Clive

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Mini Magnum
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Re: Solaris srx Laser

Post by Mini Magnum » 21 Aug 2018, 13:20

They are UK legal though clive. Anything under 490mw is a Class 3B laser, for example the Starlight Dragonfly is a 100mw laser, they may have large aspheric heads to increase throw and intensity, but there not collimated beams like a laser pointer, which is the most damaging.

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cliveward
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Re: Solaris srx Laser

Post by cliveward » 21 Aug 2018, 13:58

Mini Magnum wrote:
21 Aug 2018, 13:20
They are UK legal though clive. Anything under 490mw is a Class 3B laser, for example the Starlight Dragonfly is a 100mw laser, they may have large aspheric heads to increase throw and intensity, but there not collimated beams like a laser pointer, which is the most damaging.
Class 3B covers a wide range of powers and are indeed legal for sale in certain circumstances, but with the caveat that the customer knows exactly what they are doing with them and can use them safely.

It's very arguable that a laser with a NOHD of 20m+ can't be used safely on something that's handheld by the user, so shouldn't be sold. :think:

I've mentioned in the past that 100mW is about the top end of safe sensible use in a 3B illuminator, where set up properly then the exposure at 1m is pretty much safe which covers any unforeseen hazards such as reflections from vehicle glass or objects on the ground near the muzzle.

We've been selling 500mW and 1000mW diffused laser illuminators for years, but only to professional customers who are qualified and do their own site and risk assessments. We wouldn't sell one to a general consumer. :wtf:

It's a bit of a moot point because the one we tested was actually putting out Class 4 power density and that was one of the least collimated of this new recent batch of designs.

The calculations made earlier do take into account the diffused beam. It still wasn't safe within 20m, based on those very conservative numbers of 500mW (which it wasn't).


Cheers





Clive

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Mini Magnum
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Re: Solaris srx Laser

Post by Mini Magnum » 21 Aug 2018, 14:17

What about the laser torch fitted to the Warden units then Clive , thats class 3B is it not ?

jackal1
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Re: Solaris srx Laser

Post by jackal1 » 21 Aug 2018, 16:34

cliveward wrote:
21 Aug 2018, 12:54
jackal1 wrote:
21 Aug 2018, 11:59

And your point is what exactly?

People know these lasers are not eye safe and treat them accordingly.
The point is the average consumer doesn't know these are not safe, especially when manufacturers marketing blurb states that they are UK legal, designed with safety in mind, as safe as they can possibly be, etc. :roll:


Cheers


I very much doubt that anyone specifically looking for and purchasing a 500mw laser doesn't know what they are doing and more to the point aren't eye safe without care. :roll:





Clive

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Re: Solaris srx Laser

Post by phoenix » 21 Aug 2018, 17:16

For me the big issue with IR lasers is that unless you get very close to them, you can't see them, and if you're close enough to see them then the risk of eye damage is high.
Re the laser in the Adder/Addonight/WG760 - it's a visible red laser and much more easily seen, and therefore easier to avoid.

Cheers

Bruce
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Mini Magnum
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Re: Solaris srx Laser

Post by Mini Magnum » 21 Aug 2018, 19:59

Hi Bruce

The likes of the Dragonfly are the same, they can be seen if you wave your hand in front of them or even look from an angle... To me the benefits, image sharpness and distance make them a whole lot better for rear add ons at distance, every LED torch I have tried so far with the setups I use are no match for the Dragonfly upto now. Although I still always use caution and always wave my hand in front of the torch to check if its on, if I'm going to remove it or move it.

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Re: Solaris srx Laser

Post by weejohn » 22 Aug 2018, 10:03

I 100% agree with what you say mini magnum.
If I never used a laser with the ward800l it would be pretty much unusable on my march scope.
The DFK has transformed it from a 100 yard setup to easily shooting things way beyond 300 yards.



Mini Magnum wrote:
21 Aug 2018, 19:59
Hi Bruce

The likes of the Dragonfly are the same, they can be seen if you wave your hand in front of them or even look from an angle... To me the benefits, image sharpness and distance make them a whole lot better for rear add ons at distance, every LED torch I have tried so far with the setups I use are no match for the Dragonfly upto now. Although I still always use caution and always wave my hand in front of the torch to check if its on, if I'm going to remove it or move it.

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