The UK Badgers Menu

Chat about your shooting and hunting. (Nothing illegal or cruel, please). Post pics or videos.
pickle
Stihl pickled
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The UK Badgers Menu

Post by pickle » 01 Sep 2016, 22:13

What is the favourite food of a Badger. I have seen them at night trolling up and down between rows of cut grain stubble but cannot see what they are eating if anything as too far away. Now the field is being ploughed Mr B has disappeared. Apparently they eat hedgehogs and there are precious few hedgehogs around here - there used to be. There are more slugs around than ever before, probably the recent Spanish variety and they are huge and even graze on the top of small ponds eating pond weed. No Hedgehogs here even though they eat slugs I read. Does Mr B eat any thing bigger in the same way of a fox for instance, chickens, other domestic fowl - what have you. Actually should we be calling this the EU Badgers diet; strangely we hear nothing - no news of Badgers or their little nuances from the BBC or any other UK based media org in Europe. Do foreigners eat badgers and sell their skins for instance? Do Eastern Europeans put rings through their noses and make them dance like bears. Are there any badgers left in the EU.
Last edited by pickle on 04 Sep 2016, 19:57, edited 1 time in total.

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some bloke
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Re: The UK Badgers Menu

Post by some bloke » 01 Sep 2016, 23:36

They have been known to eat frogs... 8-)
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stacka
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Re: The UK Badgers Menu

Post by stacka » 02 Sep 2016, 08:01

Any thing from slugs and worms, to weak lambs.

pickle
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Re: The UK Badgers Menu

Post by pickle » 02 Sep 2016, 08:40

One of the reasons why i got into this NV business was because an animal of sorts started using our garden as a 'highway' on to the estate. Like most estates in the UK built on farmland - animal land. Anyway, by and by our nocturnal hiker moved everything I put over the ever expanding hole it made under our fence. Breeze blocks, bricks and even a medium sized paving slab, there was no stopping this brute and I could never catch sight of it. So having almost completed my first NVF spotter my wife came back from walking the dog one day and said there was a large animal lying in the road up the road aways. Well Mr B stopped coming after that day. The irony being that I can now see Badgers foraging at night over the field aways thanks to you guys. Frogs and lambs, sounds like it should be the name of a pub. Thank you stacka and one for you some bloke - now that the guys are ploughing the field I can see much further at night with the NV kit. Would this be because because the stubble was in some way attenuating the IR. I really can now see quite bit further - but then I did buy another updated IR torch.

stacka
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Re: The UK Badgers Menu

Post by stacka » 02 Sep 2016, 08:50

Yeah the IR bounces off the crop a lot, especially if your low down.

Tubed stuff is a bit better because your using ambient light at night, and the time you do need a extra IR you don't need as much....I won't try and spark the Digi V Tubed debate but you will notice the difference.

One of our biggest issues on the estate's is the black and whites...the cause a lot of damage, but as you know protected so loads of other measures have to be put in place to try and prevent them doing the damage.

Controversial debate, again probably best not one to have here

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some bloke
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Re: The UK Badgers Menu

Post by some bloke » 02 Sep 2016, 09:04

Grass and stubble will reflect more light - and will often cause the camera to shutter itself down a little which affects long range illumination.

If you want your spotter to see long range aim its focused beam higher in your monitor, bear in mind low range doesn't need anywhere near as much illumination and you can easily light that up when needed by defocusing it.

If you want to see shuttering occur watch this video but imagine it upside down where the sky would relate to the foreground being lit up:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAYz4AoBtwY
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pickle
Stihl pickled
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Re: The UK Badgers Menu

Post by pickle » 02 Sep 2016, 09:44

I wish I took more notice of your advice because have seen this some bloke YT vid before and it didn't mean anything to me at the time. Am now realising your advice is very important to extract the best from the system, so Vid is now bookmarked for posterity. This 'shuttering down' business is intrigueing given the tiny little E700 just going about its business. Crucial man - but don't hold your breath cos I can't think straight upright. Many thanks.

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fizzbangwhallop
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Re: The UK Badgers Menu

Post by fizzbangwhallop » 02 Sep 2016, 10:56

stacka wrote:Any thing from slugs and worms, to weak lambs.
They don't even have to be weak lambs... but then again I guess in the process of being born classifies them as that. Sheep farmers have it stacked against them... in varying amounts depending on where they are in the country. Up on the West Coast they've got.... foxes, badgers, crows, ravens, crows, golden eagles, sea eagles and greater black back gulls to contend with.... all looking for a nice bit of lamb for dinner. Then there's any inclement weather to contend with.

I've seen evidence of it all over the years I've been going up. Badger and raven attacks are an increasing problem as their populations rise out of control... if they 'catch' a ewe in the process of a difficult birth there's no mercy.. the bloody ravens and gulls will have the eyes of the ewe out first before going round the back for dinner..or in through the side. I've seen a picture of the back end of a ewe eaten down to the bone whilst the front end was still alive when discovered.

Who'd be a sheep farmer?

Who'd be a sheep?

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A correct grip on the butt & cheekweld is imperative for accurate shooting. :crazy: :lol:

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sunndog
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Re: The UK Badgers Menu

Post by sunndog » 02 Sep 2016, 13:24

You aint wrong fizz. I'v personally found two strong ewes eaten alive by badgers. both times they went in through the bag (udder)
The ewes were probably overthrown when the badger found them


Badgers.......'arder than a coffin nail!
oslon black drivers
http://nightvisionforumuk.com/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=2333

when asking for advice, please include what n.v device and/or illumination you already have (if any) and what rifles you intend to use them on...cheers

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fizzbangwhallop
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Re: The UK Badgers Menu

Post by fizzbangwhallop » 02 Sep 2016, 15:07

sunndog wrote:You aint wrong fizz. I'v personally found two strong ewes eaten alive by badgers. both times they went in through the bag (udder)
The ewes were probably overthrown when the badger found them


Badgers.......'arder than a coffin nail!
The Peaky Blinders of the animal world.
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A correct grip on the butt & cheekweld is imperative for accurate shooting. :crazy: :lol:

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