Axes, what do you know about them ?

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sunndog
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Re: Axes, what do you know about them ?

Post by sunndog » 18 Aug 2016, 06:12

Pic from phil


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when asking for advice, please include what n.v device and/or illumination you already have (if any) and what rifles you intend to use them on...cheers

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rodp
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Re: Axes, what do you know about them ?

Post by rodp » 18 Aug 2016, 16:08

sunndog wrote:Pic from phil


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That's the one, only not in such good condition :lol:
"Land Rover, the worlds best 4x4 by far"

"Argo, a great 8x8"

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rodp
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Re: Axes, what do you know about them ?

Post by rodp » 18 Aug 2016, 16:38

hairyyoda wrote:Rod can you weigh the axe head on it's own ? is the axe head very close to 310 grams ? thinking along the line that if the weight of the axe head is in grams, the axe head started it's life in Europe ?
Phil
Forget most of the above information about your axe head Rod, "it was close but not close enough in the Carling way" done some more research and your axe head is a Eagle Edge Tool Company "Kent pattern" that would have been made in The Eagle Works in Monmore Green Wolverhampton.
Several big named makers like Brades had linked with Elwell before 1930 ??? when Edward Elwell and the owners of The Chillingdon Tool Company formed Edge Tool Industries. Detailed photograph of the Eagle Edge trademark to follow.

EAGLE STREET (Monmore Green)
The 1902 OS Map shows small terraced housing on the southern end of this street, possibly indicating a similar date to that of Eagle Street, Penn Fields, though the houses seem to have been of much smaller size. Somewhere nearby, but fronting the canal and not this street, was the large company, the Eagle Edge Tool Company. There must be some connection between the company and this street. There is also an Eagle Works in Brickkiln Street. It is not known whether there was any connection between these streets, the works, the company and Mr. Eagle.

Looks like most of the edge tool makers were all tied together at some point. eagle had a tie in with Bache brothers, got to be the same ones as Churchill Forge, although no mention of it. Don't think Brades ind est exists now, but would imagine it was in what is now Brades Rd, Oldbury.
None of the old brochures etc I can fine show the elongated diamond with EAGLE stamped inside so may be a much later Spear and Jackson stamping. No way of dating this axe head but would guess at 60's, still older than a lot of members on here though :lol: Unfortunately, in the early sixties I was off to secondary school :(
"Land Rover, the worlds best 4x4 by far"

"Argo, a great 8x8"

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hairyyoda
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Re: Axes, what do you know about them ?

Post by hairyyoda » 18 Aug 2016, 17:55

Rod, some light reading instead of whispering sweet nothings to your good woman when you can't sleep :thumbup:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hunt_and_Sons

http://www.historywebsite.co.uk/Museum/ ... /eagle.htm

http://billhooks.co.uk/the-uncommon-and-unusual/

I will find you more vintage treasures this weekend :roll:

Phil
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rodp
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Re: Axes, what do you know about them ?

Post by rodp » 18 Aug 2016, 18:22

Phil, was I mistaken when I thought you were sending another one up ? held off sending cash as I was going to pay for both by recorded delivery ??


I've got it wrong again haven't I ? :oops:
"Land Rover, the worlds best 4x4 by far"

"Argo, a great 8x8"

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rodp
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Re: Axes, what do you know about them ?

Post by rodp » 18 Aug 2016, 18:45

hairyyoda wrote:Rod, some light reading instead of whispering sweet nothings to your good woman when you can't sleep :thumbup:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hunt_and_Sons

http://www.historywebsite.co.uk/Museum/ ... /eagle.htm

http://billhooks.co.uk/the-uncommon-and-unusual/

I will find you more vintage treasures this weekend :roll:

Phil

yeah I found those articles Phil, quite interesting really.

Here's a little bit of tittle tattle about the old works around here

http://www.blackcountrybugle.co.uk/weho ... story.html


And here's a shot of the Lion works in Old Hill

http://www.britainfromabove.org.uk/image/epw007461

My unit / factory is about 500 yds from the station (top (ish) left). Looks nothing like this now but the station is still there, and the high St and other roads.
"Land Rover, the worlds best 4x4 by far"

"Argo, a great 8x8"

Radagast
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Re: Axes, what do you know about them ?

Post by Radagast » 20 Aug 2016, 00:41

Why do I get the idea that Rod comes from a long line of axe murderers? Being this fascinated with the heritage of guns is perfectly normal and rational. Axes? Got to have a screw loose! :lol:

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rodp
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Re: Axes, what do you know about them ?

Post by rodp » 20 Aug 2016, 15:48

Radagast wrote:Why do I get the idea that Rod comes from a long line of axe murderers? Being this fascinated with the heritage of guns is perfectly normal and rational. Axes? Got to have a screw loose! :lol:

Radders, it's the heritage of the Black Country that interests me, not just axes (although they are fascinating) :crazy: The Black Country started, and was the centre of, the industrial revolution, possibly the greatest man made change in the world. Without it the world wouldn't be what we see now, we had the first steam pumps EVER in England (for draining mines in Tipton) We built the first steam loco in America (Lion works, Stourbridge, 500 yards from me now). We made steel tools that transformed the globe.
To me it's interesting to see these items, some of which my grandfather could have made and certainly various mates grandparents. This heritage needs preserving for future generations, if only to show just what we did and how easy it is to do it :thumbup: Kids today look at something and stare in amazement, they haven't a clue these days how to make anything.

I can relate to it in some way as I was born and raised in a Tipton slum, houses with communal yard and toilet, bog paper (newspaper squares) shoved on an old nail, 12 inch gaps above and below the bog door. I can still remember clearly my mom getting the tin bath out in front of the fire once a week, and my old man lighting the gas lamps when the electric went off (probably no money for the meter), my brother and I fetching coal in an old pram. I was one step removed from making nails in an outhouse, same housing, just a few short years after their generation.
"Land Rover, the worlds best 4x4 by far"

"Argo, a great 8x8"

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hairyyoda
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Re: Axes, what do you know about them ?

Post by hairyyoda » 20 Aug 2016, 23:45

Rod.
Your quote>>>
Radders, it's the heritage of the Black Country that interests me, not just axes (although they are fascinating) :crazy: The Black Country started, and was the centre of, the industrial revolution, possibly the greatest man made change in the world. Without it the world wouldn't be what we see now, we had the first steam pumps EVER in England (for draining mines in Tipton) We built the first steam loco in America (Lion works, Stourbridge, 500 yards from me now). We made steel tools that transformed the globe.
To me it's interesting to see these items, some of which my grandfather could have made and certainly various mates grandparents. This heritage needs preserving for future generations, if only to show just what we did and how easy it is to do it :thumbup: Kids today look at something and stare in amazement, they haven't a clue these days how to make anything.

Your right in all respects about our heritage being both important and interesting, "no offence to any white collar workers" but it usually follows that tradesmen who have had apprenticeships and journeyed through their trade have an interest and appreciate the craftsmanship and skills of the past, when apprenticeship trades went into decline there has and are far fewer numbers of the working population capable of "turning their hand" to a lot of the trade skills of yesteryear. A cracking example of the "lack of know how" can easily be shown by the number of stores/outlets/petrol stations that sell a small bundle of chopped firewood for £3.99 and 6 small firewood logs in a string sack for £4.99
There is no hope, we're all doomed it just a question of what time of the day and on what date everything comes crashing down :lol:
Phil
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Radagast
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Re: Axes, what do you know about them ?

Post by Radagast » 21 Aug 2016, 02:58

Most days I drive down a freeway between a series of tower blocks full of Chinese immigrants and a golf course.
The golf course used to be swamps full of sweet water and pure white sand.
The tower blocks were glass bottle factories and a brewery.
Yes, its true. The first industrialisation in Sydney was for making beer.

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